Ballet Class on The Floor?

It takes years to become a proficient ballerina, technically speaking. Nurturing the artistic aspect takes a lifetime, as it is a continuous process. But not everyone is born to dance professionally. How can the rest of the non-dancing world benefit from the complete workout that ballet dancers enjoy? Ballet class on the floor! What if you could mold your body into a healthy and aligned physique, with elongated, well-toned muscles, attain core strength and the calm and grace of a ballerina? My first encounter with this sort of workout was in Paris, when I first heard of barre au sol classes, literally: barre on floor. Back in the late 70’s and early 80’s, ballet floor exercises (also known as floor barre, barre à terre, barre par terre) was part of a dancer’s training. Now-a-days, professional dancers practice some form of body conditioning for increased strength, which helps prevent injuries and lengthens their careers. In Paris, I loved the freedom of barre au sol class, I could be graceful without the strain of gravity. Years later, I took a few Pilates classes. And now, I’ve added exercises to my ballet-floor routine from Zena Rommett’s Floor-Barre® program. Ballet Class on the Floor Marisa Wright over at HubPages shares in detail her own experience with this wonderful technique. Barre exercises are the building blocks of ballet. But there are times when barre work isn’t appropriate. For beginners, doing barre at home isn’t recommended because without a teacher watching, it’s too easy to get out of alignment. A floor barre workout is the perfect solution, because the floor keeps the body in line...
Zena Rommett’s Floor-Barre® Technique: Personal Review

Zena Rommett’s Floor-Barre® Technique: Personal Review

Dancers, from classical ballet to modern, Broadway actors and singers, even athletes swear by Zena Rommett’s Floor-Barre® Technique. Among her students, Zena has taught Judith Jamison, Tommy Tune, Patrick Swayze, Lar Lubovitch (and company), principal dancers with ABT, NYC Ballet, Joffrey, Martha Graham, Jose Limon, and many more. Former dancers, who are teachers now, include: Robert Atwood, Douglas Bolivar, Dawn Hillen and Mark Rubin. Since 1968, Zena Rommett’s Floor-Barre® Technique has helped injured dancers recover quickly and extend their careers. The program has also aided “regular” folks who suffer from back pain, significantly reduce or eliminate completely their symptoms, so even the non-dancer will benefit from her program, also known as The Art of Floor-Ballet. “By utilizing the floor, and without the stress of gravity associated with ‘standing’ at the ballet barre, dancers learn to align their bodies, lengthen their muscles, strengthen their joints, and fine-tune their movements. Floor-Barre® makes it possible for dancers to execute classical ballet movements with principles of alignment which are anatomically correct, and by using only the appropriate muscles… Over the past 50 years, Zena Rommett has earned the respect of the medical profession as a pioneer in injury prevention and rehabilitation.” You can learn more by visiting DanceNerds.com. Video from YouTube. Zena Rommett’s Floor-Barre® Technique Over 10 years ago I hurt my back during company class, but was not aware how severe the injury was until the following morning when I could not get out of bed! I was taken to our company’s physical therapist immediately and with rehabilitation I was back dancing in 2 weeks. Since then,  I continue to strengthen my core...

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